Skip to main content

About your Search

20121224
20130101
STATION
KQED (PBS) 6
CSPAN 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
WETA 2
WJZ (CBS) 2
CNNW 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
LINKTV 1
LANGUAGE
English 18
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
community. >> we respect all religions, but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832, the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of the greek state about the construction and commitment. >> there is still resistance. well over 90% of greeks are orthodox christians. while many accept the moscow plan, many are opposed, resentful of mass migration here. >> greece fought hundreds of centuries of terrorism -- of tyranny by muslims. we totally oppose this. >> pride in their own faith is clear, but can they resist the respect of the other? this is a country where religion is intrinsic to national identity, where church and state are intimately linked. t
of muslim women are defying their religion by mailing out of their faith. the women are often ostracized from the families and communities. some experience violence. now in a ground-breaking move, muslim and christian groups are calling for interfaith marriages to be accepted. a report from london. >> when she told a deeply religious parents she intended to marry non-muslim, they were devastated. feared us because it would not be islamic league valid she would be committing a grave sin. >> a mother was very hostile because she said you cannot marry outside of your religion because it would cause massive issues in the future. fundamentally the biga problem thelly, i cannot marry outside of my faith and what does it mean as a muslim and for the community and how they perceive me. >> her husband, a christian, did not convert. >> we believe in one god. we have a similar book. in the form of the
every religion and culture has one thing in common, a doomsday scenario. do you think that's why so many people take these predictions seriously? >> listen, you said it right there. every religion no matter what they disagree on has the end of the world moment. almost every one of them. the answer is oddly in the fine print. that's the interesting part. who knows what will be next. there will be one that's next. i don't think it is because religion tells us. but we don't want to feel like we are a dumb animal that gets wiped out. we see it as judgment. that's what you see in religions. we want to feel someone is out there. there is nothing wrong with feeling like we are not alone in the universe. why do we keep looking to this disaster and why will there be another? we just want to feel like we are not alone. the only thing you don't want to see is people being taken advantage of for that. >> there are several more doomsday predictions in the near future i'm sure will get as much hype as the dateses get closer. why do you think people are so fascinated. even when this one didn't pan out
of the world's great religions: buddhism, the fourth largest religion in the world. he was the son of a king, a pampered prince who abandoned a life of pleasure to seek enlightenment. >> even buddha himself in order to get final enlightenment need hard work. >> gere: it was an arduous spiritual journey. >> he was eating one grain of rice per day. he was standing on one foot. he was sleeping on nails. >> gere: meditating
people, as he put it, to build a more fraternal society, allowing religions to make their contribution. the vatican's relations with beijing reached a new low earlier this year with the detention by chinese authorities of a new roman catholic bishop of shanghai, which had previously than approved. he gave his blessing in 65 languages. [cheers and applause] >> although he sometimes walks with a stick and is tushed on a traveling platform to save his strength when he fish yates at masses, pope benedict wears his 85 years relatively well. at times his voice may be slightly hoarse, but his determination to continue in office is unshaken by increasing age. "bbc news," rome. >> at least 27 people have been killed in a plane vash in southern kazakhstan. it was considering -- carrying several people. they said the plane had up and only fragments remains. it came down close to the city of shymkent. >> a plane has crash landed on a road in burma. two died and 11 were injured when the aircraft came down three kilometers short of its intended destination. here is our report. >> a burned-out shell
a huge community. >> we respect all religions but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832 the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of the greek state about the construction and commitment. >> there is still resistance. well over 90% of greeks are orthodox christians. while many accept the moscow plan, many are opposed resentful of mass migration here. >> greece fought hundreds of centuries of terrorism -- of tyranny by muslims. we totally oppose this. >> pride in their own faith is clear, but can they resist the respect of the other? this is a country where religion is intrinsic to national identity, where church and state are intimately linked. the
their religion. in fact, restrictions on baha'is extend far beyond their religious practices to further restrict their civil rights and their human rights. many members of the baha'i faith living in iran are even subject to harassment, to persecution by the regime and others with extensive reports of confiscation of property, restrictions on travel and raids on baha'i homes and businesses. the iranian government continues to arrest and detain baha'is based on their religious beliefs with at least 60 cases logged last year alone. the members of the national leadership of baha'is in iran arrested in 2008 and unfairly tried with minimal access to their defense attorneys are now serving a 20-year sentence for crimes, crimes including insulting religious sanctity and propaganda against the regime. the government maintains possession of many baha'i properties that were seized following the 1979 revolution, including holy places, cemeteries and historical sites. many of those properties have now been destroyed. baha'is are barred from leadership positions in the government and are only permits to enrol
and religion t is widespread. there is frustration about it. as julie said there is a deep vein of frustration in the country. and i think that is what we are seeing, this this one case has sparked off, you know, this citizen's protest didn't come out of nowhere. it's not a new issue. there have been sexual violence against women in india for many, many decades. but i think the sense ever a new feeling of kind of liberation about being able to take to the streets and say something about it is why we are seeing so much action right now. >> when a woman overcomes her own misgivings, pressure from her own family, and actually goes to the police, what happens? are the accusations investigated? are the accused tried? >> well this is one of the bigger problems, ray. because first of all it has to be said that the vast majority of the rapes are not reported in india as all over the world. but especially in india because it is a huge that would. there is a cultural no-no against it. it can ruin your life, if are you raped will you not get married. you could be thrown out of your village. so that is th
to a community and to sing with all different religions and all different types of music. it's really good. ♪ >> even if you speak different lanks -- lanks, lank -- languages. >> and their friends come, too. it's an opportunity to see our cathedral. >> it's amazing. >> the first time i saw it, it was just incredible. it's very ornate and decorative. >> i constantly get the feedback from people that say how much they appreciate it and that 2 really -- it's -- it's become a tradition. it gets their season started. it's a gift. it's a gift to give back. >> i always get a little emotional. i get choked up and i just see that it is -- i'm pleased it's still continued sort of in his spirit. there's something magical about playing at christmas concerts. >> i think it's good to listen to that and hear that. >> it's awesome to get the holiday season with songs. >> you can see this story and more from our photojournalist on our special that airs tomorrow right near at noon and 5:30. you can watch it at 7:30 on kicu tv36. >>> california saved nearly $250 million by requiring state lawmakers to driv
. [applause] >> tonight, religion and politics with analyst george will. followed by a discussion on climate science and politics. and later, james hansen. >> tomorrow on washington journal, we will talk about the latest on the fiscal cliff with a columnist. that is followed by a look at president obama's cabinet for his second term. our guest is reporter david jackson. and then a look at what is next for iraq. we are joined by author michael gordon. live at 7:00 eastern on c- span. >> i started to get word in the summer and fall of 1774. the british out of roles and diplomats were reporting to the crown the colonists are sending ships everye
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)